Pipeline Leak Detection & Prevention
Williams has a comprehensive pipeline integrity program designed to not only detect pipeline leaks, but also prevent them from occurring.
Click the markers on this diagram to learn more about the specific components of our safety program.
Aerial Inspection Public Awareness Regular Patrols Line Markers Block Valves Valve Inspections One Call Leak Surveys Cathodic Protection Anodes Meter to Measure Volume Temperature Sensor Pressure Sensor Gas Control Weld XRay Cleaning Pigs Inline Inspections High Tensile Strength Steel Protective Coating Pipe Wall Thickness Pressure Testing Pipeline Replacements Hydrostatic Testing
Regular Aerial Inspections
To help protect against third-party damage, which is the leading cause of pipeline incidents, regular inspections by low-flying aircraft keep a watchful eye on the pipeline routes and adjacent areas. Heavily populated areas are inspected and patrolled more frequently.Close
Gas Control
Highly-trained pipeline personnel monitor our systems 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Dispatchers can quickly activate emergency shutdown procedures if they detect a problem.Close
Public Awareness
Safety information regarding our operations is distributed annually to landowners, residents and businesses located near our facilities.Close
Regular Patrols
Pipeline maintenance crews perform facility inspections, check for construction activity in the vicinity of the pipeline, and maintain the pipelines and their rights of way. Heavily populated areas are inspected and patrolled more frequently.Close
Line Markers
In accordance with federal law, aboveground pipeline markers are used to alert the public of the presence of one or more pipelines within an easement. These markers, which contain the name of the pipeline operator and emergency contact information, are usually located near road, rail, fence, water crossings and curbs.Close
Block Valves
Block valves are used to stop the gas flow, either during maintenance or in the event of an emergency.Close
Valve Inspections
Valves are inspected annually to ensure that they are operable in the event of an emergency.Close
One Call
Williams actively supports the nationwide One-Call system. When a call is made to One-Call, Williams will come to the excavation site and mark the location of our pipeline using spray paint on the surface directly above the pipeline or by placing flags identifying the type of underground service.Close
Leak Surveys
Leak surveys must be conducted at least once every calendar year. More frequent testing is done depending on the nature of operations and location of the pipeline.Close
Cathodic Protection
Once the pipeline is placed in the ground, Williams installs a system called cathodic protection, which along with the pipe's protective coating, is designed to prevent corrosion.Close
Anodes
Cathodic protection systems work by connecting the steel to be protected to another more easily corroded sacrificial metal to act as the anode.Close
Meter To Measure Volume
Gas volumes are continuously monitored as gas flows through the pipeline. This information is electronically sent to our Gas Control center. Our equipment can detect even a slight change in gas flow. Dispatchers can quickly activate emergency shutdown procedures if they detect a problem.Close
Temperature Sensor
Gas temperature is continuously monitored as gas flows through the pipeline. This information is electronically sent to our Gas Control center. Our equipment can detect even a slight change in temperature. Dispatchers can quickly activate emergency shutdown procedures if they detect a problem.Close
Pressure Sensor
Pipe pressures are continuously monitored as gas flows through the pipeline. This information is electronically sent to our Gas Control center. Our equipment can detect even a slight change in pressure. Dispatchers can quickly activate emergency shutdown procedures if they detect a problem.Close
Hydrostatic Testing
Once the pipeline is in the ground, but before it is placed in service, it undergoes hydrostatic testing. This means the pipeline is tested with water at pressures higher than normal operating pressure to ensure the pipeline's integrity.Close
Pipeline Replacements
Sections of the pipeline may be cut out and replaced if potential problems are detected.Close
Pressure Testing
After the pipe is fabricated at the pipe mill, it is pressure tested.Close
Pipe Wall Thickness
In more highly populated areas, stronger, thicker steel is used to provide an additional margin of safety.Close
Protective Coating
Protective coatings are applied at the mill and on on-site to prevent moisture from coming into contact with the metal. Any time a pipeline is excavated, company personnel inspect the pipeline and coating for evidence of damage or corrosion.Close
High Tensile Strength Steel
At steel rolling mills, where pipe is fabricated, pipeline representatives carefully inspect the pipe to ensure quality meets or exceeds both federal and industry-wide standards.Close
In-Line Inspections
Internal, electronic inspection devices, called smart pigs, are used to detect any anomalies. Slight changes in the pipe's steel wall thickness can be identified with this sophisticated tool.Close
Cleaning Pigs
Cleaning pigs are used to help prevent internal corrosion.Close
100% Weld X-Ray
All of the welds linking the pipe joints are x-rayed to ensure integrity.Close